now and then

Sunday Cigar Ramblings – Jan 23, 2010

Saturday night I had the opportunity to go to a local watering hole, Williams Downingtown Hotel,  to see my  friend Greg play with his band, Now and Then.  One of the great things about this venue, and I believe I’ve mentioned it here before, is that it allows smoking!  The fact that it is a stone’s throw from home helps too. Now and Then is a trio of highly talented  musicians who play a mix of music, ironically, from now….and then!  They do a great job with a selection of classic rock and newer rock.  As a drummer myself (retired), I always enjoy great live music, and these guys ROCK.  I lit up a Chateau Real Gran Cru Perfecto maduro to start the evening.  I usually let new arrivals sit for a while, but these just looked so good, and they are!  medium bodied with a nice coffee/cocoa flavor.  I brought one of these for Greg also, who joined me between sets and very happily lit it up and seemed to enjoy it.  Greg and I went to high school together, and when we reconnected last year we found that we share the love of cigars.  Our schedules have prevented us from actually getting together for a smoke, so it was great to finally be able to catch up over a cigar.  Thanks to Greg  for giving CigarCraig.com a shout-out! I should have left you a lighter in case that cigar went out again!

Greg asked me a question last night that I didn’t get a chance to answer, so I figure this is a great place to address the question.  The question was regarding hygrometers, digital versus analog, and calibrating them.  Let me speak to calibration first:  Most of us probably don’t  want to actually change the calibration of our hygrometer, especially if it’s digital.  We want to get an idea how far it’s off so we can make a mental correction (or, if you’re like me, you write the variance on the unit so you don’t forget).

Humifiers and hygrometers out of 2 different humidors.

Here’s a simple way to test your hygrometer:  Take a small container like a bottle cap, and fill it with salt. Make the salt damp with water (don’t soak the salt completely). Place the wet salt and your hygrometer in a ziploc bag, or an airtight container and leave for 8 hours. Your hygrometer should read 75%.

I’m old fashioned. I still use florist foam based humidifiers in my humidor and cooler.  I have an old Radio Shack digital hygrometer and an analog thermometer/hygrometer that I got at a hardware store.  I rarely look at them, and rely on feel and how my cigars smoke to give me an indication as to whether I need to pay attention to my humidity sources.  I also have had a little bottle of propylene glycol for about 10 years, but my gallon of distilled water is starting to get low.  In addition to being old-fashioned, I’m also lazy.  The latest technological advancement in humidification is the polymer beads. You can get these in pre-set humidity levels and they seem really simple to use.  You can physically tell by the volume in the container when they need distilled water added.  I haven’t gotten around to trying these yet, but Heartfelt Industries seems to be a credible source for these.

If your humidity gets too high, a simple trick I’ve used is placing a container of dry white rice in your humidor.  Rice is a great desiccant, although, now that I think about it, aren’t rice producing areas usually really wet and humid?  Ironic, isn’t it?

Obviously this isn’t new or original information, but just some of my experience over the last 14 years of keeping cigars.   Cigars want to be kept in a reasonably damp environment, 65% relative humidity works for me, and they want to be at a comfortable temperature, too warm and you risk insect problems, which is another post all together.  Other than that, it isn’t rocket surgery.  I hope this information is of value to someone.

Congratulations again to our January contest winner, DJ from Boston.  Make sure you check out yesterday’s post and see the video of the selection process.

Until the next cigar,

CigarCraig